This website provides information on the tricolored blackbird (Agelaius tricolor), a near-endemic California passerine and the most colonial songbird in North America. We seek to develop a site with content appropriate for the largest audience, with basic natural history and conservation information, access to reports, images and videos, links to tricolors in the news, summaries of past and current research and monitoring efforts, and data entry capability for participants in the triennial tricolored blackbird survey (an every three year volunteer effort to estimate the number of tricolors in California) and persons observing color-banded tricolors.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Announces 90 Day Finding


Today, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service announced a 90 day finding of a petition filed by the Center for Biological Diversity to place the Tricolored Blackbird on the Endangered Species List.

The finding states: "Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the tricolored blackbird (Agelaius tricolor) based on Factors A, C, D, and E. However, during our status review, we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the tricolored blackbird, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information for Status Reviews, above)."

The public may submit comments to the Service by midnight November 17, 2015 regarding the status of the tricolored blackbird by one of two methods:

State Endangered Status Allowed to Expire


Today the California Fish and Game Commission voted 2-1 to allow the emergency protection of the tricolored blackbird to expire by not recommending a full review by the Department of Fish and Wildlife of the status of the species.

C.B.D. Petitions U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service for Emergency Listing of Tricolored Blackbird as Endangered under E.S.A.


Today the Center for Biological Diversity petitioned the Secretary of the Interior to list the tricolored blackbird as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. The Center cited the recent steep population decline as documented in the most recent statewide surveys conducted in 2008, 2011, and 2014 as evidence for the need for federal protection.

Tricolored Blackbirds Get Emergency Protection Under California Endangered Species Act


This morning, the California Fish and Game Commission voted 3-2 to grant emergency protections to the Tricolored Blackbird. The Commission's action grants a 180-day period for the Department of Fish and Wildlife to determine whether to make the protections permanent.

The Commission was responding to a lawsuit filed by the Center for Biological Diversity in October, 2014.

Center for Biological Diversity Files Emergency Listing Petition


The Center for Biological Diversity on Wednesday, October 8, 2014 filed an emergency petition to protect the tricolored blackbird as endangered under the California Endangered Species Act. The Center cited the numerous threats faced by tricolored blackbirds and the dramatic decline documented most recently in this year's Statewide Survey. The Center's petition listed losses of native habitats, including wetlands, grasslands and shrublands, to agriculture, urbanization, market hunting and shooting in autumn when tricolors forage in mixed flocks on ripening rice with red-winged blackbirds, pesticide use, and harvest of grain fields while eggs and young are in the nests as among the factors resulting in the decline. The losses of native habitats and widespread pesticide use are the most likely causes of the chronic low productivity of the species, and the continuing severe drought is likely further stressing the species.

2014 Statewide Survey Final Report Released


The 2014 Statewide Survey Final Report was released on July 31, 2014.

This report contains the results of the 2014 Statewide Survey, comparisons to past statewide surveys, and conservation recommendations.

Results of the 2014 Tricolored Blackbird Statewide Survey


The 2014 Statewide Survey was held from April 18-20, 2014. It appears to have been the most comprehensive Statewide Survey ever, with 143 participants surveying for tricolors at 802 locations in 41 counties.

The California population estimate derived from the Survey was 145,000 birds. This is a 44% reduction from the 258,000 birds seen during the 2011 Survey and a 63% reduction from the 395,000 birds seen during the 2008 Survey. Thus, the number of tricolors in California continues a rapid decline.

The number of birds declined most markedly in the San Joaquin Valley, where there were 78% fewer birds seen in 2014 than in 2008 (73,482 vs. 340,703), and along the Central Coast, where there were 91% fewer birds seen in 2014 than in 2008 (627 vs. 7014). The number of birds in the Sierra Nevada foothills was up 145% compared to 2008 (54,151 vs. 22,586), and the number of birds seen in southern California was up 126% compared to 2008 (12,386 vs. 5,487).

Rapid Decline in Abundance Subject of CBS News Report


The recent sharp decline in the number of tricolors was highlighted on national television on Saturday, June 28th, 2014 on CBS Evening News. The story, by CBS News reporter Bigad Shaban, was recorded on Thursday, June 26th at the Conaway Ranch in Yolo County. The piece features research by U.C. Davis avian ecologist Dr. Bob Meese and cites the link between widespread and chronic reproductive failures to insufficient insects in the diets of breeding birds.

Article in Fresno Bee Highlights Decline in the Number of Tricolors


An article in the Fresno Bee highlights the plight of the tricolored blackbird and efforts being made to conserve at-risk colonies in silage grain fields and the recent, on-going severe population decline. It also mentions the 2014 Statewide Survey as an attempt to get a current population estimate.

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